First, what’s frittata?  I turned to wikipedia for the “official” definition:

“A frittata is a type of Italian omelette that frequently features fillings such as meats, cheeses, and vegetables. Like a normal omelette, a frittata is prepared in a skillet. However, whereas a normal omelette is cooked on a stovetop and served folded, a frittata is first partially cooked on a stovetop but then finished under the grill (broiler) and served open-faced

It sounds pretty accurate.  I would add couple of things:

  • A frittata is usually much thicker than a regular omellette.  In fact, it’s not uncommon for it to be about an inch.
  • It does not necessarily need to be cooked in the oven.  In fact, I have never used the oven.  Just keep the heat at medium-low with the lid on. Then turn the frittata around (see trick below) and you’ll be fine.

Like omelettes you can get very creative with the frittata.  A few weeks ago, we had friends over for brunch and I prepared two of them (1) sausage+onion, and (2) potatoe+leek.  In this post I’ll cover the first one. 

Ingredients (feeds 4-8 people):

  • four spicy sausages (you can also use regular ones).  ps: get the good ones!!!
  • 10 eggs
  • one onion
  • salt. pepper, herbs (I used a bit of thyme)
  • olive oil (extra virgin)
  • I used a 8-inch pan

Steps:

1. I start by cooking the sausages by themselves in just a drizzle of oil.  In the meantime beat the eggs and add salt, pepper and the herbs.  When the sausages are brown take them out. 

 sausages cimg2938-600.jpg

2. Now add 3-4 tablespoons of olive oil and start sauteeing the minced onion.  Make sure to keep the heat on medium.  You don’t want to fry the onion.  When the onion start to turn golden add the sausages back to the mix and let cook for a minute.

 cimg2937-600.jpg 

 3. Time to add the eggs.  I usually stir the mix for 30 seconds or so.  Cover with a lid and let it cook for 5-10 mins.  Keep the heat on medium-low.  You want to avoid that the bottom of the frittata sticks to the pan or burns.

 cimg2935-600.jpg

 (full disclosure.  This pix is taken from the other frittata I was cooking, as i forgot to take one at this stage)

4. After 5-10 mins it’s time to turn the frittata.  The actual timing depends on the pan that you use and heat.  in general you want to see that the frittata is almost set.  The top part may still have some liquid and that’s fine.  Time to turn it.  Here’s the sequence I use:

cimg2939-600.jpg  cimg2940-600.jpg  cimg2941-600.jpg

5.  When the frittata is on top of the lid I just slide it back in the pan.  After 2-5 mins on medium-low heat it’s ready to go.  Just take it out and you’re done!

 cimg2942-600.jpg

Enjoy!!! 

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Penne all’amatriciana

April 24, 2006

Couple of weeks ago I had a few friends over for a small get together (about 10-12 people).  Aside from drinks, appetizers, and munchies we wanted to have a good pasta.  After a small debate we went for "pasta all'amatriciana".  I hadn't had it for sometime and it was cold outsite, great timing!

Amatriciana is what I define a "ubiquitous" dish in Italy.  You can find it pretty much in every restaurant, in fact in many restaurant it may not even be in the menu.  You just ask for it.  Afterall, which chef/cook wouldn't know how to make it?

The history of this dish is very interesting.  You can check it out on wikipedia.  Of course the Amatrice site (allegedly the town where the sauce was first invented) reports that the dish was indeed invented there.  Originally it was a dish prepared by the the mountain shepards and later introduced to the Romans (which renamed it "Matriciana").

Given such rich history you could also understand why there are so many different variations of the basic recipe.  Onions? Garlic? Guanciale? Bacon? Tomatos? Pecorino? Lots of questions. 

I did find lots of recipes, just to name a few: Il Babbo, Barilla (Italian), DeLaurenti, Gennarino (Italian).

Here're the ingredients I bought at QFC to make the pasta for 12 people (50/50 male\female). 

  • 3 packages of "penne rigate" (Barilla
  • 3 big cans of "crushed tomatoes" (S&W brand)
  • 6 fresh tomatoes
  • 2 sticks of celery
  • 1 onion 
  • 1 carrot
  • 1 pound of pork steaks (the ones with a little more fat)
  • 1 pound of thick fresh bacon
  • Parmiggiano
  • Red pepper flakes
  • Salt, Pepper, olive oil

My tought process on the selection of the ingredients:

  • It would have great to have guanciale,  but it's not that easy to find and I decided on the dish two hours before dinner.  Get some good chunks of pork that have a mix of lean and fatty parts…it's not that far (butcher' son speaking here!)
  • Yes, pancetta is better than bacon…but it costs four times as much and it does make a difference when you are cooking for lots of people.  Go for the thick fresh bacon.
  • I had parmiggiano already…so I did not go off and buy the pecorino.  This ingredient is quite important…invest a few extra $$$ and get it from a higher-end market (I got mine at PCC)
  • Celery, tomatoes, crushed tomators, etc… I use these for the tomato "base" sauce .  I will probably cover this in a different posting another day.
  • I chose penne for a couple of reason: (1) Bucatini where not available and penne are actually a great alternative from a flavor perspective (they absorb lots of flavor and that's great with a rich sauce) (2) penne are much easier to eat standing or sitting who knows where.  "ease" of eating is always an important factor when cooking for lots of people…bucatini don't really fall in this category.

Now the steps for the sauce.

  1. Get a nice and thik sauce pan and add olive oil.  I probably used a little more than half cup, my grandma would reccomend leaning toward the "more" olive oil rather than being short.
  2. Warm up the olive oil and add the chunks of pork (I took the steaks and cut them in bite-size chuncks).
  3. After a minute add the bacon (need to cut it in small chunks as well)
  4. Have everything cook until "lightly golden".  Don't burn it, don't worry too much about being perfectly cooked, it will get cooked more later.
  5. Remove the pork and bacon from the pan and place it in a platter.  You'll need this later.
  6. Now add the diced onion, the diced celery and the diced carrot.  Let is cooked until "lightly golden".  Don't burn it!
  7. Add the diced tomatoes (I usually discard all the "tomato interiors" before dicing it)
  8. Have the tomatoes cook for a few mins…you'll see the tomato starting melting
  9. Add the pork stuff back and give it a good stir.  
  10. After 30-60 seconds add the crushed tomatoes from the cans
  11. Spice it up!  Add the chilli pepper flakes (a teaspoon), pepper and salt.  Don't be shy!
  12. Now, get it to the simmering point and leave it cooking for at least an hour. Keep stearing the sauce as necessary.  You don't want it to burn at the bottom.
  13. The sauce is pretty much done (I usually leave it on a the very low heat)

The pasta part is relatively straightforward:

  1. Bring a big pot of water to boil
  2. Drop the pasta and add salt (a good handful is a good start)
  3. Let is cook for about 12-15mins.  NOTE: the cooking time indicated on the package is based on the time the water is boiling.  This means that to properly cook it you need to add a few extra mins
  4. Taste the pasta…so you know if it's cooked right
  5. When you are done just drain it

Bringing the dish together

  1. Take the drained pasta and pour it in the sauce (with the heat on)
  2. Stir them together over medium heat for a minute or so
  3. optional: add some cheese as you are steering. This is optional since you could do it later directly in the plate, think of people that don't like cheese!
  4. You are good to go!!!

To close on the story.  Everyone seemed to have loved the pasta.  The real proof is that there was no pasta left and everyone got a second serving.

You can find a few reference pix here.

Would love to hear any suggestions or comments!